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  1. #1
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    My name is Mahmoud Hamed. I'm currently a first year medical student in Egypt and I plan to move to Germany to continue my medical education (Human Medicine) there. I had a few specific inquiries which I can receive the answers to only from current Medical students in Germany. I want to know more about some specific details of German medical courses since all German institutions tend to usually address the topic in broad terms and discuss general details (length of course, accreditation, phases and exams, etc.) and ignore more-precise details. My questions are as follows:

    1- How differently do Medical Schools / Colleges educate their students in Germany? Here in Egypt, the system and blueprint are common among all Medical Faculties (Integrated Modular Teaching). Is it the same in Germany, or does every college act on its own? I've heard that the universities of Berlin, Hamburg, along with a few others have the Module System, too.

    2- How clear is the content to-be-studied made? I heard from a German medical student once, that Professors tend to 'recommend' books to students with no real identified section / portion to be studied for each topic. Students do the studying from various sources and references on their own. Here in Egypt, it's quite the opposite. We study from identified Presentations (in the form of PDF) that the Professors make and less occasionally specified portions / chapters from books and references.

    3- How much material is presented to students? Studying medicine in 5 years is tough. How do they manage that? Do they just throw a ton of material at students and let them deal with the pressure or do they present a reasonable amount of material to be studied over the course of the five years?

    4- How much do professors and tutors care to actively guide their students? Do they use efficient presentation and education methods with proficiency or do they just bluntly give out the bundles of information they're supposed to? Do they exert effort into showing students clear lines to walk on or do they just leave them float?

    I know that my questions might seem very hazy and unclear (and I apologize if they seem naive) but I honestly tried my best to communicate them as best as I could. Also, I know that these questions can have majorly varying answers, most of which are "it depends," but I hopefully plan to hear from multiple students so that I can make an overall deduction that would hopefully give me a broad idea of how the educational environment in medical schools in Germany generally is structured. Thanks!



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  2. #2
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    1. The general legal regulations for German medical degrees are found in the Approbationsordnung. This law is valid for any medical degree in Germany, regardless of whether it is a Regelstudiengang (traditional degree structure with modules such as physiology, medical microbiology, or internal medicine) or a Reform- or Modellstudiengang (more modern degree structure, often with modules such as cardiovascular system or musculoskeletal system). Even within these two categories, there is a lot of heterogeneity with respect to assessment, exams, etc. Every university is different. One advantage of studying at a university offering a Regelstudiengang is that switching universities is much easier in that case.

    2. In general, pretty vague. Often, lecture notes are uploaded to online platforms, but they aren't always overly helpful for exam preparation. Many students focus on old exam questions as well as prep books/platforms (such as Medi-Learn, Endspurt or Amboss), with the added help of shorter textbooks where necessary. But there are huge differences with respect to how different students prepare. When I think back, many of my fellow students used different textbooks, different approaches to exam preparation, etc. Everybody's finding his or her own way.

    3. No need to worry. The vast majority of students complete their degree. Drop-out rates for medicine are very low. They are somewhat higher for international students, but that's usually due to language problems and/or lack of social cohesion. In my experience, international students are more likely to study alone (or with other international students), more likely not to keep in touch with other students, more likely not to stay on top of regulations, deadlines, etc., which of course raises the risk of failing exams. If your command of German is decent, and if you make sure to study "as German students would", keeping in touch regularly, forming study groups, staying on top of administrative details, etc., you will most likely be able to successfully complete your degree. I know plenty of international students who did very well in their degree.

    4. There is very little individual guidance. German universities favour a "DIY" approach to studying. But medicine has the huge advantage that every student takes the same exams at the same time. Hence there is a strong sense of cohesion among medical students, and students help each other all the time. So again, you don't really need to worry. A good mastery of German is the most important aspect in my opinion. If your German is decent, everything else will fall into place.



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  3. #3
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    1. The general legal regulations for German medical degrees are found in the Approbationsordnung. This law is valid for any medical degree in Germany, regardless of whether it is a Regelstudiengang (traditional degree structure with modules such as physiology, medical microbiology, or internal medicine) or a Reform- or Modellstudiengang (more modern degree structure, often with modules such as cardiovascular system or musculoskeletal system). Even within these two categories, there is a lot of heterogeneity with respect to assessment, exams, etc. Every university is different. One advantage of studying at a university offering a Regelstudiengang is that switching universities is much easier in that case.

    2. In general, pretty vague. Often, lecture notes are uploaded to online platforms, but they aren't always overly helpful for exam preparation. Many students focus on old exam questions as well as prep books/platforms (such as Medi-Learn, Endspurt or Amboss), with the added help of shorter textbooks where necessary. But there are huge differences with respect to how different students prepare. When I think back, many of my fellow students used different textbooks, different approaches to exam preparation, etc. Everybody's finding his or her own way.

    3. No need to worry. The vast majority of students complete their degree. Drop-out rates for medicine are very low. They are somewhat higher for international students, but that's usually due to language problems and/or lack of social cohesion. In my experience, international students are more likely to study alone (or with other international students), more likely not to keep in touch with other students, more likely not to stay on top of regulations, deadlines, etc., which of course raises the risk of failing exams. If your command of German is decent, and if you make sure to study "as German students would", keeping in touch regularly, forming study groups, staying on top of administrative details, etc., you will most likely be able to successfully complete your degree. I know plenty of international students who did very well in their degree.

    4. There is very little individual guidance. German universities favour a "DIY" approach to studying. But medicine has the huge advantage that every student takes the same exams at the same time. Hence there is a strong sense of cohesion among medical students, and students help each other all the time. So again, you don't really need to worry. A good mastery of German is the most important aspect in my opinion. If your German is decent, everything else will fall into place.



    Thank you very very much for this. I really appreciate you taking from your time to answer my questions so vividly. One last thing I'd like to know, though, if you don't mind, is something regarding the third question. When I asked about how much material is taught to students, I didn't ask so because I was hesitant I might fail. I'm actually a very hard-working (yet somewhat dumb tbh) student and I tend to be among the more excelling students. Failing is something I don't consider as a possibility (at least I hope not.) Also, as an International student, I won't have anything to distract me from my studies. I just asked that question out of curiosity to kinda try to evaluate the differences between my current academic life in my medical school and the one of my future (hopefully) medical school in Germany and because I want to know in general how much material I should be able to ingest on average. I apologize for the late reply since I have hard time dealing with this forum and I'd like to thank you again for your deeply appreciated help!



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  4. #4
    Diamanten Mitglied
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    No worries - you're welcome!



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